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Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Faculty

You will find info, applications, events, and important dates below


What is Community Engaged Learning (CEL)?

At its most basic, CEL involves students, faculty and community partners working together to apply knowledge in authentic settings in order to address community needs while also meeting instructional objectives. CEL enhances and deepens students' understanding of an academic discipline by facilitating the integration of theory and practice. This high impact teaching method provides students with experiences that develop life skills, with opportunities to engage in critical reflection, and with the intellectual space to understand and contribute to the public purpose of their chosen major or discipline. It is a strategy, a process, an experience that involves both action and reflection. 

Click here for 2-Page CEL information sheet


Community Engaged Learning

  • Meets instructional learning objectives through course content, faculty-structured service, engagement, and critical reflection and is meant to prepare students to be civically responsible members of the community.
  • Generates and applies academic knowledge in a community-based setting; student service and engagement address the needs of the community as identified through mutually beneficial collaboration with community-partners.
  • Helps our University anchor itself in the public square by providing meaningful connections between our teaching, research, and service, and the issues our community is grappling with everyday.

Three Core Traits of a CEL Class

  1. Course design incorporates community engagement to facilitate and/or enhance student learning
  2. The course identifies learning outcomes that address both academic understanding  and community needs identified in partnership with the community
  3. Reflection is utilized throughout the course to enhance learning, understanding, and broader connections to society

CEL Learning Outcomes

  • Develop and apply the abilities needed to influence positive community change including research skills, project management, leadership, critical thinking, communication skills and/or intercultural competence
  • Increase their awareness of and reflect on the interconnectedness between individuals, society, and public policy
  • Develop habits related to ongoing community engagement
  • Articulate an increased sense of responsibility and commitment to the public purpose of their chosen discipline
  • Enhance awareness of their sense of place in and ownership of community issues, especially issues of diversity, justice, environmental sustainability, and/or equality.
  • Further develop professional life skills: showing up, being reliable and punctual, keeping colleagues “in the loop”, maintaining project deadlines, etc.

CEL Course Designation Details

University of Utah faculty may apply to have their courses designated as community-engaged learning (CEL) in the schedule of classes. Identifying courses in this way is beneficial for you and your students. Among other things, the CEL designation:

  • Helps students see that they are enrolling in a CEL course when they register.
  • Introduces students to the idea of community-engaged learning before they attend class on the first day.
  • Brings greater visibility to the practice of community-engaged learning at the University of Utah.
  • Provides data to track these courses and identify the faculty and students who engage in this meaningful practice.
  • Enables the Bennion Center to document the benefits of this pedagogy to students, the community, and faculty, and report those benefits to administrators, community partners, donors, and others.

Applications and syllabi are reviewed by the Community Engaged Learning Course Designation Committee.

Materials must be submitted online by the following dates for consideration: March 1st for Fall classes, October 1st for Spring classes, and February 1st for Summer classes.

CLICK HERE FOR CEL Course APPLICATION


CEL Funding

CEL-designated classes automatically earn funding to recognize their value and also the extra effort it may take to provide deeply engaged learning opportunities. Funds are transferred to programs and departments after the Office of Budget and Institutional Analysis (OBIA)  completes its calculations. The additional funding must be reinvested in your community-engaged learning program. Some of the legitimate uses include:

  • Purchasing materials or equipment for student CEL projects and/or for a community partner to allow for engagement.
  • Paying an honorarium to a community partner for working with a CEL class or group of students.
  • Paying the parking for a community partner who comes to campus to talk with a CEL class.
  • Paying background checks for students (it is now a requirement if students in CEL classes are working with children under the age of 18).
  • Paying for a semester-end party/open house, which could entail CEL presentations by students to community partners.
  • Reimbursing a faculty member who teaches CEL courses for associated expenses (e.g., mileage, if the individual has regular meetings with community partners; meals, if the individual has a lunch meeting with a community partner; supplies, if the individual needs to purchase software or books).

The Bennion Center tracks the uses and effectiveness of this CEL SCH funding and reports outcomes to the Office of the President. Please use the below linked form to report how you or your academic unit(s) utilized the CEL SCH awards to support your CEL efforts. It is important to understand the variety of ways these awards support our campus-wide community engaged efforts.

Click here for CEL SCH Funding Form


Special Considerations for CEL Courses

Is your CEL course an Online Course? If students will be completing more than 6 hours of required community engagement outside of the state of Utah, the University is required to seek authoriation from each state where the work occurs. Please contact Katie Sexton at the Curriculum Administration's State Authorization office to initiate the authorization process. 801-585-7490.

 The University of Utah has adopted a Safety of Minors Policy (1-015) to help ensure that all minors who participate in University programs have a safe and meaningful educational experience. This policy also applies to all community-engaged learning courses that have interactions with children under the age of 18. Read the details about the required steps


CEL Designation Review Process

The Bennion Center’s Community Engaged Learning Committee oversees the review process for both new CEL designations and 5-year reviews of CEL designated courses. Applications are reviewed according to criteria described in the attached rubrics.  In addition to meaningful community-based learning, the CEL Committee is looking for robust CEL-related learning outcomes, evidence of reciprocal dialogue among faculty and potential community partners, and consistent reflection opportunities to contemplate broader societal issues related to the discipline.

CEL COURSE DESIGNATION RUBRIC

5-Year CEL Renewal Rubric

In addition to the above described review processes, the CEL Committee advises the Bennion Center’s Leadership Team on strategic matters related to CEL instruction campus-wide. If you are interested in serving on the CEL Committee, please contact Amy Sibul.


Questions? Contact  Amy Sibul, Associate Director for Curriculum & Scholarship

CEL Teaching Assistants

Having a CEL TA can help to facilitate a consistent community-engaged learning experience for students enrolled in the course and community partners. If awarded, your CEL TA can support your teaching in these ways:

  • Articulating the purpose of community-engaged learning to students and community partners.
  • Helping prepare students and community partners to work with each other.
  • Assisting faculty with identification, coordination, and communication with community partners throughout the semester.
  • Providing ongoing communication, technical assistance, and problem-solving for both partners and students.
  • Developing and/or assisting in developing the plan for reflection and assisting with reflection activities.
  • Coordinating community partner evaluations.

Students who serve as CEL TA's receive a financial award based on class enrollment and availability of funds. For qualifying classes with <25 students, a $900 award for a 0.75 CEL TA. For qualifying classes of 25-74 students, one full-time CEL TA position is funded at $1250. For classes larger than 75 students, multiple CEL TA positions can be funded on an as-needed basis as funds are available. 


Application Due Dates

Applications are due by July 15 (for a Fall semester class), November 15 (for a Spring semester class), and March 15 (for a Summer semester class). Successful applicants will be notified within two weeks of application deadlines. Awards are contingent upon the availability of funds, and will be distributed during the first two weeks of the semester awarded.

Please review the eligibility criteria, below, then use the online form to submit your application for a CEL TA award.

Contact Amy Sibul if you have questions.

NOTE: APPLICATIONS FOR CEL-TA's ARE NOW CLOSED for the 2021-22 school year. All available funding has been awarded 

Click here for CEL TA Application


Eligibility

For Faculty: 1) instructors interested in developing a community-engaged learning course by “test teaching” it, and 2) instructors who teach a CEL-designated class may apply for a CEL TA award. 

For Students: Instructors may select an undergraduate or graduate student for their CEL teaching assistant. Prior community-engaged learning coursework is highly preferred, but not mandatory. The Bennion Center also can help you identify a student to serve as your CEL TA. In this case, preference will be given to students in the Bennion Center Scholars Program, which helps undergraduates apply their academic knowledge to community issues.

Please note: FERPA regulations require that undergraduate students who serve as TA's and grade student work must complete FERPA training prior to grading. See the below link for more information and access to the online training:

https://registrar.utah.edu/faculty/ferpa-resources.php 


Program Support for CEL TA's

Students hired as CEL TA's should watch the below 15-minute training video. It provides details about their role as a mentor to students and a point of contact for community partners. Topics addressed include: an exploration of the definition of CEL; guidance on engaged learning in higher education; key elements of critical reflection; and supporting mutually beneficial and collaborative community partnerships. Faculty that hire a CEL TA should also look over the below linked handout.

 


Additional Resources

  • "Providing Peer Mentors through a Service-Learning Teaching Assistants Program"
    • This article, by Erin Burke Brown, Lynn E. Pelco, and Sabrina Hise (Virginia Commonwealth University), discusses success stories at VCU and elaborates on ways that its TAs "have helped students understand the broader context of their educational experience and how it shapes the communities in which they live."

CEL Learning Outcomes


SCH CEL Funding


New CEL Courses


Reflection Activities


Example Syllabi


Safety of Minors Background Checks & Policy Compliance

If, as part of your CEL course, some or all of your students will be working with minors, you will need to comply with Safety of Minors policy. There are three components:

  1. Register your class with Youth Protection and Program Support
  2. Have students complete an “Authorized Adult” online training module
  3. Have students complete a background check before any interactions with minors

All relevant details and links can be found on the Policy Information Brochure linked below. You can also share the Student CBC Procedure Instructions, linked below, with your students.

If you have questions, please reach out to marci.hutchinson@utah.edu


CEL Publications that will make you think...


National & Regional Organizations for CEL


CEL Faculty Awards

The University of Utah is committed to community engaged scholarship and research. Faculty are invited to apply for the following awards recognizing research, excellence in the classroom, and passion for strengthening communities through learning, scholarship and advocacy.


Public Service Professorship

This significant award is designed to help a faculty member strengthen community-engaged learning experiences and opportunities tied to civic engagement, and also foster stronger partnerships with the local community.

 LEARN MORE & APPLY

Recipient of the 2021 Public Service Professor Award:


Milad Hosseini-Mozari2021: Milad Hosseini-Mozari, Professor in the Multi-Disciplinary Design (MDD) Program, College of Architecture and Planning 

Professor Hosseini-Mozari will utilize this award to launch an innovation hub between the MDD Program and the International Rescue Committee (IRC). It will be a collaborative space where digital access and increased tech literacy will be supported for a community that has historically experienced inequity in technological access. Professor Hosseini-Mozari comes from the community of focus, as an immigrant himself, and will serve as a bridge between students and refugees to build technological know-how and amplify immigrant voices resulting in meaningful benefits to the immigrant community.


Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Dr. David and Susan Jabusch generously donate $1,000 to the non-profit community organization of the award winner's choice.

LEARN MORE & APPLY 

Recipient of the 2021 Distinguished Faculty Service Award:


Cathleen Zick2021: Cathleen Zick, Professor in the Family & Consumer Studies Department, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.   

During her 39 years of teaching and scholarship at the University of Utah, she served as Director of the Masters in Public Policy Program, the Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Science, and as Department Chair of Family and Consumer Studies. As her nominators shared, Professor Zick’s “integration of research, service, and teaching has provided real and long-lasting relationships” for students and community partners alike. She prioritized investing her “formidable skill set to engage with students, local communities and national stakeholders to improve the lives of those around her in sustained and important service”. It is clear that many citizens of Utah and students at the University of Utah benefitted from her decades of meaningful research and community engagement.


CEL Faculty Fellow & Highlights

Kilo Zamora2021: Kilo Zamora, Engaged Faculty Fellow  

The Bennion Center for Community Engagement is pleased to announce the appointment of Kilo Zamora as this year’s Engaged Faculty Fellow. Kilo joins Amy Sibul, Associate Director of Curriculum & Scholarship at the Bennion Center, in the promotion and development of community engaged learning capacities across campus.

Kilo will co-lead this year’s CEL Faculty Learning Community discussions, and this year’s guiding theme is “Disrupting the Volunteer Conundrum for NPO’s”. Non-profit Organizations are often ideal community partners for CEL classes, from the perspective of faculty and students. How can CEL classes be the ideal partners for NPO’s? How can we build reciprocal CEL relationships with NPO’s that often operate in a paradigm of “understaffed but volunteer-abundant”?

CEL FLC discussions are held every 2nd Wednesday of the month from 2:00-3:00pm via zoom. If interested in joining in, please RSVP here.

Kilo is skilled in creating learning environments for groups to develop themselves and transform their communities. Kilo applies his talents as a community engagement consultant and instructor in the Shcool of Cultural & Transformation, University of Utah. He teaches multiple Community Engaged Learning (CEL) classes at the UofU, and is currently undertaking an innovative process to build curriculum for a new “Gender & Nature” course by incorporating community input and engagement from the “ground up” as he builds his syllabus.


Dr. Robert Kraemer: Bringing Learning Objectives to Life

V. Kim Martinez: Art is a Right, Not a Luxury

Dr. Julie Metos: Distinguished Faculty Service Professor, 2018

Erin Carraher: Public Service Professor 2018-19

Dr. Nancy Nickman: College of Pharmacy


 

Annual Dates of Deadlines

  • CEL Applications:
    • Fall semester - March 1st
    • Spring semester - October 1st
    • Summer semester - February 1st
  • CEL TA Applications:
    • Fall semester - July 15th
    • Spring semester - November 15th
    • Summer semester - March 15th
  • Faculty Award Nominations/Applications:
    • January 31st

CEL Faculty Workshops, Town Halls, & Next Practices Retreat

For Faculty interested in learning more about Community Engaged Learning (CEL) pedagogy, and the CEL designation process. This is the ideal opportunity for new and experienced faculty alike to explore methods for teaching through community engagement and to learn about the benefits of a CEL designation for your class.


If you’re interested, please email Amy Sibul for the latest offerings: amy.sibul@utah.edu,


CEL Faculty Lunch & Learns

  • On hold during COVID-19 pandemic

CEL Faculty Learning Community Discussions

  • The CEL Faculty Learning Community for 2022-22 meets every 2nd Wednesday of the month, 2:00pm-3:00 via zoom. This year's guiding theme is "Disrupting the Volunteer Conundrum for NPO’s". Non-profit Organizations are often ideal community partners for CEL classes, from the perspective of faculty and students. How can CEL classes be the ideal partners for NPO’s? How can we build reciprocal CEL relationships with NPO’s that often operate in a paradigm of “understaffed but volunteer-abundant”?  Please RSVP here if you’d like to join in and share in this conversation.
  • If you have an idea for a CEL FLC discussion theme for the coming year, please share with amy.sibul@utah.edu

National & Regional CEL Conferences

  • This year's Utah Campus Community Engagement Network (UCCEN) Faculty Retreat is Feb 10-12, 2022 at the Red Cliffs Lodge in Moab Utah. More details for registration will be coming soon. There is an active Call for Proposals, and the Bennion Center encourages all Community Engaged Faculty to attend and present. There are several presentation styles to select from, and this year's theme is "Connecting, Reflection, and Looking Forward" with community engaged teaching, research and partnerships.
  • For more information see the UCCEN webpage and to register for the 2022 UCCEN Faculty Retreat visit here.
  • IUPUI Assessment Institute (Oct 9-11, 2021) - Each year the Assessment Institute posts the handouts of those presenters who chose to submit their handouts electronically.  Please note that not all presenters choose to submit their handouts. Please click on the link https://assessmentinstitute.iupui.edu/program/handouts.html. If you need more information on the future assessments here is the link https://assessmentinstitute.iupui.edu/overview/future.html.  

 

The Community Research Collaborative (CRC)

The Bennion Center proudly supports and encourages quality community-based research (CBR). We want community members and academic researchers to work together in powerful partnerships to uncover, understand, disrupt obstacles as well as excentuate the assets that will lead to more healthy, inclusive, resilient, and just communities. 


We want to employ CBR to:

  • Translate scientific knowledge into practice
  • Support organizing and movement building
  • Impact policy
  • Guide community and economic development
  • Foster learning and personal transformation
  • Build trust with communities harmed by past research
  • Improve organizations
  • Strengthen communities
  • Enrich our understanding of the world

Our communities struggle with deep-rooted inequities and global challenges that defy simple answers. CBR is a powerful way to address these challenges by harnessing our collective knowledge, data, and resources.

This report, produced by the U's Community Research Collaborative, offers guidance for both community-based and campus-based practioners and anyone who wants to engage in quality collaborative CBR to strengthen their community. 


The U's Community Research Collaborative is composed of researchers, organizers, activists, scholars, educators, and community leaders, who work together to advance quality participatory and action-oriented community-based research. The group and its products are supported by University Neighborhood Partners and the Bennion Center.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL REPORT ON CRC GUIDELINES


 

Community Engagement Certificate

Learn about our new academic credential!


CLICK HERE to learn more

Attend virtually on October 20th

(listen, be heard, & reflect)

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Meet Minerva! After moving from Southern California to Salt Lake City, Minerv...
1
Meet Minerva! After moving from Southern California to Salt Lake City, Minerva decided to get involved with community engagement to find a way to make new connections. Within a CEL (community engaged learning) course, Minerva was able to take class lessons and apply them to real life scenarios. “The community engagement course has also allowed me to develop skills that I cannot solely learn through a book such as being able to approach strangers and engage in meaningful conversations,” Minerva said. In a City and Metropolitan Planning class, Minerva learned that despite the pandemic, people were eager to talk about parks and how important they are to them. Minerva was able to realize that with the pandemic, parks have become a sanctuary place for many during the pandemic - they are one of the few places where people still felt they could gather safely, entertain their children, exercise, and find peace. 
Minerva said, “Taking a certified Community Engagement Learning Course (CEL) would be beneficial to individuals who want to understand the challenges in their community, identify ways to get involved, and refine their professional and personal interests.” If you want to learn more about Minerva’s experience with CEL courses, check out her blog at the link in our bio!
Meet Minerva! After moving from Southern California to Salt Lake City, Minerva decided to get involved with community engagement to find a way to make new connections. Within a CEL (community engaged learning) course, Minerva was able to take class lessons and apply them to real life scenarios. “The community engagement course has also allowed me to develop skills that I cannot solely learn through a book such as being able to approach strangers and engage in meaningful conversations,” Minerva said. In a City and Metropolitan Planning class, Minerva learned that despite the pandemic, people were eager to talk about parks and how important they are to them. Minerva was able to realize that with the pandemic, parks have become a sanctuary place for many during the pandemic - they are one of the few places where people still felt they could gather safely, entertain their children, exercise, and find peace. 
Minerva said, “Taking a certified Community Engagement Learning Course (CEL) would be beneficial to individuals who want to understand the challenges in their community, identify ways to get involved, and refine their professional and personal interests.” If you want to learn more about Minerva’s experience with CEL courses, check out her blog at the link in our bio!
 
 
 
 
 
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Last Updated: 11/21/21